Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Food Hopping: Why I've Stuck with Inconsistent Feeding

In my pantry right now
For over three years now, I have been exploring the wide world of dog food. In that time, I have never bought two bags of the same food in a row. As soon as I begin to run out of one bag, I transition over to another brand. This means that, at maximum, my Labrador is eating a certain food for about thirty days. I've had some interesting discussions with the workers at the pet store within walking distance of my condo, and they think it's simply bizarre that I would do what I do. It's unusual, sure, but I think it's had a positive effect on my fella.

Before this journey began in early 2012, Ebon hadn't really eaten that many foods in his life. When I first brought him home, he and our old dog Charlie ate Purina One and I was not the major decision maker in what sort of food was bought (I was only sixteen at the time). When Iams became cheaper at the grocery store we went to, we switched to Iams. Ebon was fed Iams for maybe three years. I got older and wiser and Ebon was eventually switched to Nutro's Natural Choice, then to Blue Buffalo. Purina One and Iams did Ebon no favors, and the changes when he stopped eating them were pretty fantastic. I finally switched him to the PetSmart-exclusive Simply Nourish, which was the food he was eating when I decided I wanted to try something different. I started doing single-bag trials and reviewing the food based, in part, on how well Ebon did while eating it.

The funny thing about this, though, is he has been generally more stable in terms of coat quality, digestive health, and energy than he was when being fed a single food for an extended period. Sure, there's been some duds that upset his stomach and so on, but he also had more than a few incidents when he had been eating the same kibble for months. There's a reason why I worry so much about his stool and call his stomach "a bit touchy." For the longest time, it seamed like so little could set him off. But since my little experiment started, he's had fewer problems and the ones he does have tend to be more minor. This could very well be a coincidence, but I suspect it's more than that.

For people, it's not generally considered healthy to eat the same thing day in, day out. So, why wouldn't that same rule apply to our pets? A person shouldn't eat turkey on rye for every meal, so why should a dog eat lamb and brown rice for the rest of its life? While pet foods are meant to be complete and balanced for long-term nutrition, it is still very possible that a certain food would lead to some sort of deficiency thanks to things like digestibility, ingredients, and nutrient bioavailability. For example, I've discussed before my concerns about the inclusion of plant-based protein boosters in pets foods. Nutritional information on pet food is very limited, and one of the few things that we do get are things like the percent of food that is protein. The problem with this is that plant proteins, due to being more difficult to digest, have a lower bioavailability than animal proteins. That means that the amount that can be measured in the sources is different than the amount that a body can actually absorb and make use of. Since dogs, being carnivores, have short digestive tracts, bioavailability is a very valid concern when discussing food quality. A food with a large amount of plant protein may mean that a dog isn't able to actually utilize as much protein as it should. In addition, plant proteins are generally not complete, meaning they're missing one or more essential amino acids: the protein building blocks that a body cannot manufacture itself. Those amino acids have to come from somewhere, and deficiencies can cause pretty serious side effects (see Kwashiorkor).

Due to all of that, it's not unlikely that even a very well formulated food has flaws. So, switching between foods on a regular basis may have the positive effect of mitigating whatever nutritional deficiencies a certain food may have. Considering what I've seen with Ebon, this very well may be what has happened with him.

It's also been fascinating to learn more about how my dog ticks. Comparing him to my parents' dogs has also contributed to my current opinions of dog food. One main thing? Every dog is different. Ebon does better on more calorically dense foods than my parents' greyhounds. For Ebon, fish-based foods are more likely to set him off than mammals and birds. Grain-free and grain-inclusive foods aren't any different for him even though a lot of dogs do best on grain free. The greys can't go grain free because it gives them the runs. Then again, a lot of things give them the runs. They have the notoriously awful stomachs that are so common in the breed. Ebon has his issues, but they're pretty exclusively linked to nervousness, while for the greys it could just be a Wednesday.

After all this time jumping brands and knowing that Ebon does well as long as the food fits a fairly short list of criteria, I've been shopping sales and picking up whatever hits the right balance of quality and price. One major advantage to this is I can often save several dollars a bag versus if I was constantly buying the same brand every month. I also have a few other criteria. I watch how much rice Ebon eats, since there is some concern about levels of arsenic. I am careful about my own rice intake, so I'm careful about his too. I never feed two bags of dog food that contain rice in a row, so it tends to alternate between grain-free and grain-inclusive. I also try to rotate out proteins, but this isn't as easy to do. He tends to get a lot of chicken, but I buy non-chicken food as often as I can.

When my little experiment first started, my goal was to find a food to settle on for the rest of Ebon's life. Now, however, I think I'll continue to switch it up indefinitely.

Ebon recently, still as happy as ever. 

5 comments:

  1. Years ago, I fed my dog a home made diet due to some diet-related heath issues. I did this based on science with the National Research Council guidelines and a spreadsheet and MANY hours at the USDAA nutritional database. After a few years of this, the price of beef started to go up and I wanted to try adding some of the newer commercial foods to my dog's diet to save money and time. I wanted to do this without unbalancing his food, so I decided to put some of these foods into my spreadsheet.

    I made several discoveries about the nutritional profile of commercial dog foods: 1) Many companies hide their nutritional info and will not even give it when requested. 2) The nutritional profile of any product varies from lot to lot. 3) Dog foods vary GREATLY in nutrient profile across brands. "Complete and Balanced" does NOT mean what it implies.

    I've seen the numbers. Whenever I have a dog that can tolerate it, I always rotate foods.

    Stacey

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